Experiences

Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park is one of the largest national parks in northern India, covering an area of 392 km. It is situated in the Sawai Madhopur district of southeastern Rajasthan, about 110 km northeast of Kota and 160 km southeast of Jaipur, which is also the nearest airport. The nearest town and railway station is at Sawai Madhopur, about 11 km away. The park is also close to the Kota railway station. RIDCOR operates a mega-highway between Kota and Ranthambhore. Ranthambore National Park lies at the edge of a plateau and is bounded to the north by the Banas River and to the south by the Chambal River. It is named after the historic Ranthambhore fortress, which lies within the park.

Ranthambhore was established as the Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary in 1955 by the Government of India and was declared one of the Project Tiger reserves in 1973. Ranthambore became a national park in 1980. In 1984, the adjacent forests were declared the Sawai Man Singh Sanctuary and Keladevi Sanctuary, and in 1991 the tiger reserve was enlarged to include the Sawai Man Singh and Keladevi sanctuaries.

Ranthambore wildlife sanctuary is known for its tigers and is one of the best places in India to see these animals in their natural jungle habitat. Tigers can be easily spotted even in the daytime. The best times for tiger sightings at Ranthambore National Park are in November and May. The park's deciduous forests are characteristic examples of the type of jungle found in Central India. Other major wild animals include leopard, nilgai, wild boar, sambar, hyena, sloth bear, southern plains gray langur, rhesus macaque and chital. The sanctuary is home to a wide variety of trees, plants, birds and reptiles, as well as one of the largest banyan trees in India.

Ranthambore Fort

Perhaps the only one fort, which is not visible from a long distance. The Fort is a massive enclave and quite high. Mughal Emperor Shah Alam gifted it to Sawai Madho Singh I of Jaipur in 1754 AD and since then it was maintained as the private hunting preserve. Much later, Queen Elizabeth II and Duke of Edinburgh were part of the Royal Hunting, who stayed here too. It's a unique Rajput Fort. Archeological Department took over the fort in 1954 and area of the fort is 4½ square kilometres. It is 1578 feet from the sea level and 750 feet from ground. Total area of the fort is about 7 miles. There is no drive way up to the fort, just the stairs. There are three big artificial lakes up in the Fort.

Surwal Lake

The lake of Surwal is situated next to a small village, also called Surwal. This place is frequented by bird watchers as it attracts a lot of winter migratory birds. Different types of herons, egrets, ducks and waders can be seen in large flocks here. The lake is used for fishery by some locals. The fish also attract some large fishing birds like the Brown Fish Owl and the Osprey. It takes almost half-a-day to explore Surwal, and the evening return drive can yield sightings of Jackals and Jungle Cats as they have been often spotted in the area.

The Ganesh Temple

In 1300 AD, King Hammer built the temple of Trinetra Lord Ganesh in the Ranthambhore Fort. He placed the idol of Lord Ganesh, Riddhi Siddhi (his wife) and two sons (Shub Labh) along with the idol of mushak (mouse, his vehicle). The temple remains crowded during the Ganesh Chaturthi Season.